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What are these white spots on a dracena

What are these white spots on a dracena


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I have a Dracaena Marginata which started to have some white spots. They turn out to be some kind of "mold"

which can be removed when swapping the leaf and then leaves some discolored spots

They usually appear when the leafs get yellow (because of it, or because I have forgotten to water for too long) and seem to be more present at the base of the leaf.

What is this?

And more importantly: is it a problem for the plant? (minor issue, though it is a gift from my children) or for me? (major issue, and death sentence for the plant)


These are plant pathogens commonly known as scale insect (Coccoidea). Among the genera mentioned to infect Dracaena marginata here and here the most likely candidate is Pinnaspis.

They are close relatives of aphids and psyllids (and more distantly -- also to true bugs). Cochineal is probably the most famous representative of the superfamily. Scale insects suck host's sap and can be quite dangerous to the plant. Adult females are immobile and the spreading is performed by nymphs and (when present) males.

As far as I know they are harmless to humans. When digested (products of) at least cochineal can cause allergic reaction in some persons.


How to Grow Corn Plant (Dracaena)

The corn plant (Dracaena fragrans) is an oldie but goodie in the houseplant industry. Europeans have been using these tropical African evergreen trees as indoor plants since the mid-1800s, and they’ve been popular in the United States since the early 20th century.

Corn plants grow fairly slowly from one or more thick canes (stems) that produce long, narrow leaves (like those of corn) toward the top. This growth habit gives them a similar appearance to a palm tree, which is why they’re sometimes referred to as “false palms.” They make good houseplants because they are tall and narrow, typically only reaching around 4 to 6 feet tall in containers, and they can withstand a fairly significant amount of abuse from casual indoor gardeners. Springtime is ideal for starting new plants, though you can typically pot nursery plants indoors at any time of year.

Botanical Name Dracaena fragrans
Common Names Corn plant, dracaena, false palm
Plant Type Broadleaf evergreen shrub/tree
Mature Size 15–50 feet tall and 3–10 feet wide outdoors container-grown plants can grow up to 6 feet tall
Sun Exposure Part shade, filtered sun (avoid any direct sun)
Soil Type Rich, moist, well-draining
Soil pH 6.1 to 6.5 (slightly acidic)
Bloom Time Mature indoor plants flower rarely, if at all
Flower Color White-yellow
Hardiness Zones 10–12 (usually grown as a houseplant)
Native Area Tropical Africa
Toxicity Toxic to dogs and cats

Watch Now: How to Take Care of a Corn Plant (Dracaena Fragrans)


What’s Wrong with My Dracaena?

While a dracaena houseplant is generally easy to grow and difficult to kill, there are some dracaena diseases and issues that you should be aware of and watch for. Characteristic symptoms can tell you what is wrong with your potted houseplant:

  • Tan or brown coloring on the white areas of leaves and dead or yellow leaf tips may indicate fluoride toxicity or alkaline soil.
  • Soft, brown spots on roots that smell rank may indicate soft rot disease.
  • Reddish or light brown spots surrounded by a yellow halo may mean your dracaena has leaf spot disease.
  • Yellow or dead bands across leaves can indicate your plant got too cold.
  • Visible pests, damaged leaves, or stunted growth may indicate an infestation of thrips, shore flies, scales, mealybugs, or fungus gnats.

Clogged Pores

Clogged pores, also known as comedones , are another cause of bumps on the face.

They are small, usually white or skin-colored, and give the skin a rough and uneven appearance. The white color you see is a plug of oil trapped inside the pore.

Comedones are actually a type of non-inflamed acne blemish. Like milia, they are extremely common, especially in people with oily skin.

Comedones aren't serious, but sometimes they can progress to larger, inflamed pimples. They can be annoying enough that you will probably want to treat them.

Treatment Options

Mild comedonal acne can be treated with OTC acne products containing salicylic acid or benzoyl peroxide.

If OTC products aren't working well, pay a visit to a dermatologist. They can help you devise a treatment plan for comedonal acne.


Dracaena fragrans (corn plant)

Dracaena fragrans is a popular ornamental plant commonly cultivated for hedges, living fences and windbreaks that often persists and becomes naturalized. Once established, it behaves as a weed and can be found naturalized in abandoned gar.

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Pictures

TitleVariegated habit
CaptionDracaena fragrans (sweet-scented dracena) Variegated habit. Iao Tropical Gardens of Maui, Maui, Hawaii. May 2012.
Copyright©Forest and Kim Starr/via Starr Environmental - CC BY 2.0
TitleVariegated leaves
CaptionDracaena fragrans (sweet-scented dracena) Variegated leaves. Enchanting Floral Gardens of Kula, Maui, Hawaii. October 2007
Copyright©Forest and Kim Starr/via Starr Environmental - CC BY 2.0
TitleHabit
CaptionDracaena fragrans (sweet-scented dracena) Habit. Kula Botanical Garden, Maui, Hawaii. March 2011.
Copyright©Forest and Kim Starr/via Starr Environmental - CC BY 2.0
TitleHabit
CaptionDracaena fragrans (sweet-scented dracena) Habit. Makawao, Maui, Hawaii. April 2008.
Copyright©Forest and Kim Starr/via Starr Environmental - CC BY 2.0
TitleHabit
CaptionDracaena fragrans (sweet-scented dracena) Habit. Home Depot Nursery Kahului, Maui, Hawaii. January 2008.
Copyright©Forest and Kim Starr/via Starr Environmental - CC BY 2.0
TitleLeaves
CaptionDracaena fragrans (sweet-scented dracena) Leaves. Ki-Hana Nursery Kihei, Maui, Hawaii. February 2011.
Copyright©Forest and Kim Starr/via Starr Environmental - CC BY 2.0
TitleVariegated habit
CaptionDracaena fragrans (sweet-scented dracena) Variegated habit. Makawao, Maui, Hawaii. September 2006.
Copyright©Forest and Kim Starr/via Starr Environmental - CC BY 2.0
TitleVariegated leaves
CaptionDracaena fragrans (sweet-scented dracena) Variegated leaves. Sacred Garden of Maliko, Maui, Hawaii. January 2011.
Copyright©Forest and Kim Starr/via Starr Environmental - CC BY 2.0
TitleHilo Girl leaves
CaptionDracaena fragrans (sweet-scented dracena) Hilo Girl leaves. Walmart Kahului, Maui, Hawaii. January 2008.
Copyright©Forest and Kim Starr/via Starr Environmental - CC BY 2.0
TitleFlowers
CaptionDracaena fragrans (sweet-scented dracena) Flowers. Makawao, Maui, Hawaii. August 2006.
Copyright©Forest and Kim Starr/via Starr Environmental - CC BY 2.0
TitleFlowers
CaptionDracaena fragrans (sweet-scented dracena) Flowers. Makawao, Maui, Hawaii. August 2006.
Copyright©Forest and Kim Starr/via Starr Environmental - CC BY 2.0

Identity

Preferred Scientific Name

Preferred Common Name

Other Scientific Names

  • Aletris fragrans L.
  • Cordyline fragrans (L.) Planch.
  • Dracaena albanensis Sander ex Mast.
  • Dracaena aureolus W.Bull ex Mast.
  • Dracaena broomfieldii Sander
  • Dracaena butayei De Wild.
  • Dracaena deisteliana Engl.
  • Dracaena deremensis Engl.
  • Dracaena janssensii Mast.
  • Dracaena lindenii Linden ex André
  • Dracaena massangeana Rodigas
  • Dracaena smithii Baker ex Hook.f.
  • Dracaena ugandensis Baker
  • Dracaena victoria W.Bull
  • Draco fragrans (L.) Kuntze
  • Pleomele deremensis (Engl.) N.E.Br.
  • Pleomele fragrans (L.) Salisb.
  • Pleomele smithii (Baker ex Hook.f.) N.E.Br.
  • Pleomele ugandensis (Baker) N.E.Br.
  • Sansevieria fragrans (L.) Jacq.

International Common Names

  • English: corn-stalk dracaena dragon flower fragrant dracaena happy plant pleomele sweet-scented dracaena
  • Spanish: palmillo
  • French: dracéna
  • Portuguese: coqueiro-de-vênus dracen pau-d'água

Local Common Names

  • Cameroon: ikoko
  • Cuba: dracena fragante falso ilang ilang-ilang mártir del japón
  • Dominican Republic: coco macaco palmita palmito
  • Lesser Antilles: dracene sanddragon
  • Nigeria: ogihu olu-olu
  • Puerto Rico: cocomacaco dracena drecina

EPPO code

Summary of Invasiveness

Dracaena fragrans is a popular ornamental plant commonly cultivated for hedges, living fences and windbreaks that often persists and becomes naturalized. Once established, it behaves as a weed and can be found naturalized in abandoned gardens, waste areas, pastures, disturbed sites, forest edges and along roadsides and riparian vegetation. D. fragrans is included in the Global Compendium of Weeds and is regarded as invasive in Singapore, Fiji, Cuba and Brazil, where it is displacing native species and altering successional processes.

Taxonomic Tree

  • Domain: Eukaryota
  • Kingdom: Plantae
  • Phylum: Spermatophyta
  • Subphylum: Angiospermae
  • Class: Monocotyledonae
  • Order: Liliales
  • Family: Agavaceae
  • Genus: Dracaena
  • Species: Dracaena fragrans

Notes on Taxonomy and Nomenclature

The genus Dracaena comprises 80-150 species of trees and shrubs distributed mostly in the Old World from Micronesia and subtropical Africa through Asia to northern Australia (Dahlgren et al., 1985). However, two species with a disjunct native distribution have been reported: one in eastern Cuba and another in Central America (Acevedo-Rodríguez and Strong, 2005). D. fragrans is the most popular of all the Dracaena species commercialized as ornamentals and many cultivars have been developed. This species is extremely hardy and tolerates low sunlight and low humidity (Dave's Garden, 2019).

Description

Shrub becoming arborescent to 15 m tall, the older woody stems to 30 cm or more in diameter, the younger stems conspicuously ringed with leaf scars. Leaves narrowly elliptic-oblanceolate, usually widest above the middle, (12-) 20-125 (-150) × (1-) 2-12 cm, rounded or acute at the apex with a subulate mucron, narrowly cuneate or narrowed slightly to long-decurrent at the base, bright green and often variegated above, paler green beneath. Inflorescence a terminal panicle with few, widely divaricate branches, (15-) 20-100(-160) cm long, the main axis often zigzag bracts deciduous, concave, long-cuspidate flowers arranged in pedunculate or sessile glomerules of ten or more flowers, each subtended by a triangular whitish scarious bract, (15-) 17-22 (-25) mm long, yellowish or white, often with a pink stripe, intensely fragrant perianth-lobes (7) 9-12 × 2-3 mm stamens inserted at the throat with inflated filaments, anthers 2-2.5 mm long ovary cylindrical to bottle-shaped style terete, stigma 3-lobed. Fruit red-orange, spherical to depressed-globose, 13-20 mm in diameter seeds rounded-rectangular, 6-14 × 5-9 mm.

Plant Type

Distribution

Dracaena fragrans is native to tropical Africa and has been extensively introduced as an ornamental across tropical and subtropical regions. Now, it can be found naturalized in Central and South America, the Caribbean, Malaysia, Singapore and on many islands in the Pacific region (Acevedo-Rodríguez and Strong, 2005 PIER, 2018 Govaerts, 2020 POWO, 2020 USDA-ARS, 2020).

Distribution Table

The distribution in this summary table is based on all the information available. When several references are cited, they may give conflicting information on the status. Further details may be available for individual references in the Distribution Table Details section which can be selected by going to Generate Report.

Africa

Europe

North America

Oceania

South America

Risk of Introduction

The risk of new introductions of D. fragrans is very high. This species is the most popular of all the Dracaena species and is extensively commercialized as an ornamental (Chen et al., 2002 Dave's Garden, 2019). Therefore, it is highly likely that further naturalizations and invasions of this species will occur.

Habitat

Dracaena fragrans can be found growing in thickets, forest edges, shrublands, savannahs and along roadside thickets. It is commonly planted as a hedge plant and as a garden ornamental (Gilman, 1999 Hammel et al., 2003 Acevedo-Rodríguez and Strong, 2005 PROTA, 2020).

Habitat List

CategorySub-CategoryHabitatPresenceStatus
Terrestrial ManagedDisturbed areas Present, no further details Harmful (pest or invasive)
Terrestrial ManagedDisturbed areas Present, no further details Natural
Terrestrial ManagedDisturbed areas Present, no further details Productive/non-natural
Terrestrial ManagedRail / roadsides Present, no further details Harmful (pest or invasive)
Terrestrial ManagedRail / roadsides Present, no further details Natural
Terrestrial ManagedRail / roadsides Present, no further details Productive/non-natural
Terrestrial ManagedUrban / peri-urban areas Present, no further details Harmful (pest or invasive)
Terrestrial ManagedUrban / peri-urban areas Present, no further details Natural
Terrestrial ManagedUrban / peri-urban areas Present, no further details Productive/non-natural
Terrestrial Natural / Semi-naturalNatural forests Present, no further details Harmful (pest or invasive)
Terrestrial Natural / Semi-naturalNatural forests Present, no further details Natural
Terrestrial Natural / Semi-naturalNatural forests Present, no further details Productive/non-natural
Terrestrial Natural / Semi-naturalNatural grasslands Present, no further details Harmful (pest or invasive)
Terrestrial Natural / Semi-naturalNatural grasslands Present, no further details Natural
Terrestrial Natural / Semi-naturalNatural grasslands Present, no further details Productive/non-natural
Terrestrial Natural / Semi-naturalRiverbanks Present, no further details Harmful (pest or invasive)
Terrestrial Natural / Semi-naturalRiverbanks Present, no further details Natural
Terrestrial Natural / Semi-naturalRiverbanks Present, no further details Productive/non-natural
Terrestrial Natural / Semi-naturalScrub / shrublands Present, no further details Harmful (pest or invasive)
Terrestrial Natural / Semi-naturalScrub / shrublands Present, no further details Harmful (pest or invasive)
Terrestrial Natural / Semi-naturalScrub / shrublands Present, no further details Harmful (pest or invasive)

Biology and Ecology

The chromosome number reported for D. fragrans is 2n = 38 (Mathew and Vijayavalli, 1989).

Reproductive Biology

Dracaena fragrans has bisexual flowers with a pleasant fragrance (Gilman, 1999 Acevedo-Rodríguez and Strong, 2005). In urban areas in southern Brazil, flowers of D. fragrans are visited by generalist hummingbird species (Mendonça and Anjos, 2005).

Physiology and Phenology

Dracaena fragrans flowers periodically throughout the year (Gilman, 1999).

Environmental Requirements

Although D. fragrans prefers moist shaded areas with temperatures between 15 and 28°C, it can also grow in open and sunny areas. It is adapted to grow on a wide variety of soils including sand, clay and loam and acidic to slightly alkaline soils. This species is extremely hardy and tolerates low sunlight and drought but does not tolerate freezing temperatures (Gilman, 1999 McConnell et al., 2003 PROTA, 2020).

Climate

ClimateStatusDescriptionRemark
Af - Tropical rainforest climate Preferred > 60mm precipitation per month
Am - Tropical monsoon climate Preferred Tropical monsoon climate ( < 60mm precipitation driest month but > (100 - [total annual precipitation(mm>/25]))
As - Tropical savanna climate with dry summer Preferred < 60mm precipitation driest month (in summer) and < (100 - [total annual precipitation/25])
Aw - Tropical wet and dry savanna climate Preferred < 60mm precipitation driest month (in winter) and < (100 - [total annual precipitation/25])

Latitude/Altitude Ranges

Air Temperature

Rainfall Regime

Soil Tolerances

Soil reaction

Soil texture

Natural enemies

Natural enemyTypeLife stagesSpecificityReferencesBiological control inBiological control on
Alternaria Pathogen Leaves Ghosh et al. (2009)
Cochliobolus lunatus Pathogen Leaves Xi et al. (2002)
Colletotrichum gloeosporioides Pathogen Leaves Ghosh et al. (2009)
Glomerella cingulata Pathogen Leaves Xi et al. (2002)
Lasiodiplodia theobromae Pathogen Leaves Banerjee et al. (2017)

Notes on Natural Enemies

Dracaena fragrans is infested by mites and thrips and it is also sensitive to leaf spot diseases and root rot (Gilman, 1999).

Tip blight disease in D. fragrans caused by Lasiodiplodia theobromae was first reported in India by Banerjee et al. (2017). 

Xi et al. (2002) investigated fungal diseases including bark rot, anthracnose and several types of leaf spots on D. fragrans, in Guangzhou, Guangdong, China between 1997 and 2000. The pathogens responsible were identified as Botryodiplodia theobromae, Bartalinia dracaenaea, Curvularia lunata [Cochliobolus lunatus], Curvularia senegalensis, Glomerella cingulata, Pestalotiopsis clavispora, Phomopsis dracaenae, Phomopsis dracaenicola and Sphaeropsis dracaenae. In West Bengal, India, Ghosh et al. (2009) observed during the warm and rainy months the highest occurrence, severity and intensity of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and Alternaria sp. on D. fragrans (cited as D. deremensis).

Curvularia brachyspora, Curvularia gudauskasii, Microsphaeropsis sp. and Cephalosporiosis sp. were recorded for the first time on D. fragrans (cited as D. deremensis) in Cuba (Estrada et al., 2004).

Dubey and Moonnambeth (2013) found leaves of D. fragrans in a garden in Pune (Maharashtra, India) heavily infested with Cucurbidothis pithyophila, a first generic record for Maharashtra and a new host record for India.

Means of Movement and Dispersal

Dracaena fragrans spreads by seed and vegetatively by rooting of tip cuttings, air layering and cane cuttings. In cultivation, one of the most common methods of propagation is lopping off the upper part of the stems and planting these canes directly in the ground, where they soon produce roots the old cane bases are also able to sprout new branches (McConnell et al., 2003 Acevedo-Rodríguez and Strong, 2005).


When on a plant, mealybugs look somewhat like tiny pieces of cotton stuck to the plant. In fact, the pests secrete a cottony substance in which to lay their eggs. Mealybugs cluster along the undersides of leaves and where the leaves meet stems. These sap-sucking pests drain a plant of its juices. A few mealybugs here and there probably won't severely affect the health of your plants, but enough of them can cause the plants' leaves to turn yellow and drop off.

Chemical methods usually are not recommended for getting rid of insect pests, especially on houseplants. Light infestations of mealybugs can be removed by picking them off the plants. Kill them first, if you prefer, by dipping a cotton swab in rubbing alcohol and dabbing the swab on the mealybugs. Because rubbing alcohol may damage or discolor some plants' leaves, test it on an inconspicuous portion of a plant's leaf before you use it on another portion of the plant. If a plant is heavily infested with mealybugs and is very weak or damaged as a result, then simply throwing away the plant may be the best option.


What are these white spots on a dracena - Biology

Recently I've found tiny worms in my Fire-belly tank. Some rang to about a centimeter, no bigger than an air bubble, to about half an inch.

The smaller ones are sometimes carried around by the filter and others attach themselves to the side of the tank.

The larger one swim in an "S" shape and are white, one is a light gray.

I do occasionally use rain water because it's healthier than tap water but I let it sit outside in the sun until the late afternoon when I cover the top of my water supply which I later bring inside for the froggies. I also have some lucky bamboo (Dracaena Sanderiana) in my tank if that makes any difference.

I just cleaned my tank a week ago, but I'm afraid that they may be harfmul to my four fire-bellies. Thank you for any help I may receive.

White Worms In Fire-Bellied Toad Tank?
They are some sort of ticks or mites that may harm your toads.

You have to set out a mission to clean up.

Buy a reptile disenfectant found at any good reptile shop do NOT use a normal disenfectant!

Take out everything and put your filters in hot water. Also, boil the bamboo and any other plants you might have. Hot water and boiling will kill off any of these pests.

Empty out your tank and use the reptile disenfactent for the insides, clean well!

That should get rid of them - make sure to put everything in warm water for a while!

I know it is a hard procedure but still- its for your toad's safety!

I also suggest checking out your toads- they might have these worms on them too

http://www.anapsid.org/mites.html
Reply:if you are using rain water it could be mosquito larvae, i would take the water out and put clean water in, but keep the water you take out as if it is mosquito larvae then when they turn into mosquito's you have some live food for your toad, it is more than likely when the water was outside something layed its eggs in it then in they hatched in the tank, great live food for the toads, i have fire bellied toads and they do not usually get worms, but if you leave the water in the toads will eat what ever bug it is, best of luck honey.

Can anyone help me identify these plants?

My mother bought these adorable untagged potted plants for me when my room was being redone. There are four of them. On of them I believe is a dracaena, but I am not sure. Please help! I need to know their species so that I can evaluate whether or not they are toxic for my birds.

Can anyone help me identify these plants?
plant= false aralia

dracaena is right, we call it a corn plant

vine= ivy
Reply:Partial answer: Your unknow tree is not a tree but is a scheffelera or aka umbrella plant. It can get quite large but will not make a tree. Your vine is a sweet potato vine. So much for now. Your dracena is correct. I am still workig on the first plant. It might be some sort of fern but I am looking. The other three are correct.
Reply:I think the 2nd picture could be an "Umbrella Plant". Haven't a clue about the others though.
Reply:You should have put this in the Botany section in Science and Mathematics. Of course they are more knowledgeable about plants than Landscapers, sorry to say. But thats their proffesion. Botanists = Botany = Theres your answer

Edit: People here might have answers, but you have better luck in the Botany section. Post it again over there.
Reply:ok the 1st 2 look like a dracnea and a schferrillla. the schef will get very big if planted outside so if u do plant it away from the house.The3rd looks like a ribbon plant and i believe the4th is aneedle point ivy.

I looked them up in my houseplants for modern living book.

I'm 99% sure these r ur plants or at least in those families.
Reply:The plants are the kind that need water

Traveling Plants.

I just bought a "Dracaena Lucky Bamboo" while I am visiting at my gramma in the Bay Area (near San Francisco). I am flying back to Los Angeles on the 31st, and I was wondering if anyone knew if I can take the plant with me somehow. how does that work exactly? Do you just put the plant in a box and put it in your suitcase or what?

Traveling Plants.
Cool i live in the bay area too! AnyWays take it to the UPS or Kinkos Store And Ship It to your house!

Hope I helped!
Reply:Well, this plant isn't really a bamboo, like you said it's a dracaena. Is your plant in water or in a pot with soil? Either way, all you need to do wrap your plants roots in a wet paper towel, put your plant in a plastic bag and put your plant somewhere it wont get damaged.
Reply:Wasn't there a film made a few years back, "The Sisterhood of the Traveling Plants?"

Plant Help Please?

Does anyone out there know how to care for a "Dracaena Lucky Bamboo"? I just bought one, and it said that it needs to be fertilized with "mild liquid house-plant food". I bought "Easy to Use Liquid Plant Food for Houseplants, Container Gardens, and Vegetables". Can someone please tell me any special care for this bamboo and/or how to store the liquid plant food? I'll take anything. PLEASE HELP. I want this plant to be well-taken-care-of.

Plant Help Please?
here you go..make sure you let the chlorine dissipate from tap water..of buy distilled water first..

Help! My dog munched on a plant - is it toxic?

My basset hound (which pretty much eats everything anyway and never bother her) over a week ago devoured a plant over at my friend's house. We didn't realize it until days later when she found the almost entirely empty pot! It was a Magenta Dracaena plant. I have no idea what type that is, I'm not a plant person. She was moping around all last week and slowly got back to her self but then yesterday got really mopy again and this morning was acting very weird. Was standing in the corner, almost like she was going to throw up. I am waiting to hear from the vet but does anyone know about this plant and/or if it is toxic for pets? Should I be worried? She is drinking water and eating dry food still. Nothing ever takes her appetite away. Any help would be great!

Help! My dog munched on a plant - is it toxic?
Check here: http://www.aspca.org/site/PageServer?pag.

Striped Dracaena is on this list.
Reply:you did the right thing taking her to the vet i hope she gets better but their has been pet food recalls but i highly dought thats whats making her sick. becouse you cant get the recalled food unless you have some left over go on the internet and see what foods have been recalled but its mostly the canned food. find out whats plants are poisanuis to animals go to the libery or on the inernet. p.s. i hope your dog gets better.
Reply:I would be doubtful that would be making her sick now if she ate the plant over a week ago. Have you checked the recall list for the contaminated pet food? It could be that, but if she is at the vet's office now, she's in the best place she could be and you did the right thing! She will be fine. : )
Reply:it seems that u have taken her to the vet well my only advice is to pray and also u can look the plant up on google or ask ur friend about it
Reply:Well good news is ..the plant was not on the toxic list, but what you have to know is is she pottying well, especially urninating. also beings your dog eats most anything here's a site for Toxic Plants http://www.library.uiuc.edu/vex/toxic/co.

in your case I would seek a VETS advice as well, it's been awhile. when or if you first catch an animal that has eatin poisions or something toxic, you can make them swallow Hydrogen Peroxide bout a 1/4 cup to start till or to make them vomit the poisions right away..got that from a Vet when our dachsund found some old rat D con. that someone had put out ( NOT us ) we never use such things around any kind of animal . Be Well :)

Question about watering house plants.?

I have several plants like Dracaena (lucky bamboo), Venus Fly Trap, and an Orchid all of which require distilled water because they are sensitive to chlorine in tap water. I also Have several fish tanks that require me to use a water conditioner to remove the chlorine and chemicals so I was wondering if I can use conditioned water (not tank water) instead of distilled water to water these plants. I'm kind of tired of buying special water just for a few plants. I'm wondering if anyone has ever tried this.

Anyone have any opinions or facts about this idea?

Question about watering house plants.?
Besides being sensitive to chlorine burn, the three plants you list are also very sensitive to dissolved solids and minerals. So stick with RO (deionized), distilled or clean neutral pH rainwater. Avoid aquarium, softened, or conditioned tap water for the fishies. The water conditioner has to be more expensive per gal. than RO water. RScott
Reply:How often do you do a water change in your aquarium? Why? Well, for many years, I have used aquarium water to water my plants. I had a 150 gallon tank with Discus and a few other fish that require VERY clean, low pH water.

Alternatively, you can get tap water and leave it out for a day or two, the chlorine will dissipate from the water after a day. Still have the water additives (calcium, lime, etc.), but no chlorine.
Reply:Personally, I just keep what I called "aged" water in a pitcher for my houseplants. I just run tap water in there and let it set out for at least 24 hours. My plants do great with it but I don't have the ones you mentioned. I like it, too, because the water is room temperature. No shocking my leafy buddies with cold water.
Reply:Conditioned water and reverse osmosis water are two different things. A water softner or conditioner uses salt which is a no no for all of the above. If you are refering to a RO or reverse osmosis, yes you can absolutely use that and stop the distilled. If you have a PPM meter (parts per million)you can tell how clean your RO water really is. RO is what I have used for years and is fine for everything.
Reply:Do NOT use aquariums water for your lucky bamboo. I did, and lost some of my bamboo. I use spring water for both plants and tanks.
Reply:hi there,i don't have an answer for your question but i always see you answering my questions on this acount and my other acount, and i just want to say thank you for answering so many go my questions with thoughtful and correct answers. you definielty have a talent! thanks for answering all of my other gardening questions in the past!

I just got a plant I believe to be a dragon tree( either dracaena deremensis, or dracaena marginata)?

It is large, and instead of repotting it, I believe I can take cuttings from it and make new plants from them, getting rid of what is left of the original plant( which was under stress) . I know about" Air layering" which I have no time to do( I'm moving soon) is it possible to cut the crowns of the tree and treat it as a"lucky bamboo"( Dracaena sanderiana) and "plant "it in a bowl of gravel until it roots?

I just got a plant I believe to be a dragon tree( either dracaena deremensis, or dracaena marginata)?
your idea might work. some plants will shoot roots if they are placed in water, however some will not. It would be worth a try
Reply:I think they made a good choice picking this answer. I'm going to give it a try,lol. Report It

Watering my dracaena plant?

I have a dracaena, and I'm not sure how much I should be watering it, nor am I sure of the amount of water I should be giving it each time. It's fairly young I bought it about two weeks ago. I gave it about six ounces of water, but the majority of it soaked through the pot. The last time I watered it was about three or four days ago.

Watering my dracaena plant?
how big is the pot.

six ounces into a 3 gallon pot wouldn't be excessive


but that much to a six inch pot would be way more than enough.

please have a little kindness for bugsie she gave you the right answer.

draceanas CAN take a lot of ignoring and be just fine.

make sure the soil in the pot is firmed up so the water doesn't just run through.

every ten days is plenty. almost too often.

never let it sit in water most of its roots are in the bottom half of the pot---don't change that.

they like to be pot bound,


if you can leave the water sitting out over night before you water the plant it will help reduce the chlorine/fluoride issues that draceanas sometimes have.

if you water it too often the roots will rot.

-they have some big fat storage roots.

----oh yeah, what kind of draceana is it by the way?
Reply:Thanks Fluffy, Bugsie Report It

Reply:Did you know that the common name for Dracaena is 'Mother-in-laws Tongue'?

I agree with bugsie. DO NOT OVER WATER.

Once a month should be enough depending on the type of soil.

Also, the plant likes to be crowded in its pot, so, you won't need to re-pot it too often. Don't let the roots strangle in the pot watch for that depending on the plant soil and size of container you got at the nursery.

Enjoy!
Reply:Dracaena can go a long time with out water.

UNLESS they are in the direct sun.

I live in New England, and in the winter once a month water, with some misting in between is enough.


It is very drought tolerant and cold tolerant also.

So do NOT LOVE IT TO DEATH!

pretend you don't like it and you will be more successful!

Dracaena Marginata?

This past January I bought a dracaena marginata when I was at Walmart. I felt bad, it was all droopy and sad. I brought it up and took care of it and it's grown quite a bit and it's kind of my baby--I'm not known for my green thumb, so it's survival makes me feel good.

Anyway, I really like these plants and I saw another plant of the same species at Walmart and it looked just like mine did when I bought it--rather sad.

I was wondering, if I bought it would it be safe to plant it with my older plant? (in the same pot) I just didn't know if there was anything that needed done before combining plants like that. (no green thumb, here. )

So would my original plant be ok? Should I fix up the new plant before potting them together?

Dracaena Marginata?
plants and humans in urbans areas are overfed. one should ensure that the water is drained from the pot. most of the plants die due to waterlogging. also work up the soil weekly to ensure loosening of soil. it depends on the size of the pot when u want to plant another plant in the same pot.

[email protected]
Reply:I have several of these plants myself and just keeping them alive is a chore to me! I know your feeling. my thumb is missing too!

I just re-potted a few of mine recently and they all seemed to go thought this "dying" stage and didn't look to healthy. After potting the required more water than usual to keep the plants up and going.

I personally would be afraid you might over water you existing plant trying to keep up with the new transplanted one. Besides the fact that the freshly potted on could use a bit more fertilizer.

I would keep them separate until next spring. Pot them together and let them recover together.

I'm not a plant expert by any means but this logic seems to make since in my little mind! LOL

Painted turtles and live plants?

today i got a live plant for my turtle tank. its white ribbon plants (dracaena sanderiana) . this type of plant cant hurt my turtles right? i got it from petsmart.

Painted turtles and live plants?
This plant you speak of is lucky bamboo and naturall grows in the understory of rainforests, nowhere near the natural US habitat of the the painted turtle, so i reccomend that you dont risk is, use only plant native to the animals habitat to be on the safe side.
Reply:Your turtle is going to rip it apart and dig it up. Try floating anacharis instead. It is a perfect turtle treat, adds intrest to the tank, and you don't have to worry about re-planting them every two hours.
Reply:It's poison to cats and dogs so I wouldn't risk it.
Reply:take it out. or else.
Reply:you should ask customer support at petsmart.

Another Betta question re Lucky Bamboo as a Snack?

As soon as I got my rescue fish home, I looked around the house for a "water plant" that was non-toxic to put in with him as a "soother". I had some Lucky Bamboo ( Dracena / Dracaena sanderiana ) and I cut off a 2" section that had new growth on it. I am awaiting receipt of ordered Java Moss and Ball Moss so I didn't want to shell out too much more for plants in the meantime. I put it in the tank and the old growth section floats and lets the new shoots hang down. They have been munching on the greens and seem to enjoy using it to hide and play. They particularly seem to like the green outer layer of the old growth. If I plan to use this like a treat/ snack and change it out regularly, can you see any harm in that? Since they are enjoying it, what I figure is that when I do a complete tank change once a week, I'll change out the bamboo and use the old ones as cuttings to grow more.

Another Betta question re Lucky Bamboo as a Snack?
Bettas are carnivorous,they eat meaty foods. they need bloodworms,daphnia,crushed krill,etc. They just play with plant, The bamboo plant will not do any harm and will help the bio=system.
Reply:I didn't mean answers on this question necessarily. . . I meant in general and in my experience on other boards. Didn't mean to offend. Deborah Report It

Reply:They are not vegetarian,they are insectivores.
Reply:Um the bamboo should be healthy and grow, there would be no reason to change it. Betta fish do not eat plants, they might be picking at it looking for insects or small creators to come out, as this is what they naturally eat.

Also its not a good idea to change all the water every week, having some algae growth is healthy, recommend cleaning half the tank once a month and then at the end of the month cleaning the entire tank. Over cleaning may kill your fish.

If you need to clean your tank this much then you are over feeding your fish. Remember a "hungry fish is a healthy fish. "

Help! My dog munched on a plant - is it toxic?

My basset hound (which pretty much eats everything anyway and never bother her) over a week ago devoured a plant over at my friend's house. We didn't realize it until days later when she found the almost entirely empty pot! It was a Magenta Dracaena plant. I have no idea what type that is, I'm not a plant person. She was moping around all last week and slowly got back to her self but then yesterday got really mopy again and this morning was acting very weird. Was standing in the corner, almost like she was going to throw up. I am waiting to hear from the vet but does anyone know about this plant and/or if it is toxic for pets? Should I be worried? She is drinking water and eating dry food still. Nothing ever takes her appetite away. Any help would be great!

Help! My dog munched on a plant - is it toxic?
Well, seeing as its been over a week since it happend and the dog is still alive, I'm guessing she will be ok. Usually poisonings take effect the same day or day after. However, because of her behavior, you should still be concerned. Take her to a vet to make sure. In the meantime, look at the links below for a full list. I saw "Gold Dust Dracaena" on several lists, but not Magenta. You still will want to get her checked out. Good luck.
Reply:You should verify this with your vet, but if it's been a week, then I doubt there's any harm done to the dog or it would have surfaced within hours of the ingestion.
Reply:Quick glance I don't see Dracena in either of these two sites, but that doesn't mean your doggie isn't in distress. She could have a bowel obstruction. I'd get her to the vet ASAP and get an Xray. If she had had bloat after eating the plant, she'd be dead by now, bowel obstructions take longer. I'm shocked her vet hasn't said, "Get her in here NOW. " She could still be bloating. get her in now!

http://www.vet.purdue.edu/depts/addl/tox.
Reply:Bring him to a vet to have checked out. I almost sure that it isn't toxic.
Reply:it doesn't sound toxic but wait to hear from u r vet.
Reply:I wouldn't worry to much about the plant as I had a cat once that ate the same kind and it didn't bother him at all. She may have been feeling ill already as whenever my dog feels that way, she will eat grass so she can vomit. I might check your dog food brand though..there are several that have been re-called..including some dry foods. If you're not sure if it is on the list, you should call the store where you bought it.
Reply:Your plant is called Dracaena marginata Magenta. I searched for toxicity online but couldn't find any references. doesn't mean it's not but at least you know the scientific name to use for reference when getting information on it. You may also want to call a local plant nursery and see if they can tell you.

I hope all is well.
Reply:Call your state Poison Control Center! The number should be with the other emergency numbers in the front of your phone book. They should be able to help. I think if I had called my vet about a suspected pet poisoning and they didn't return the call quickly -I'd go looking for another vet!
Reply:I am not sure about that particular plant, but I know that whenever my dog just eats yard grass she does the same thing. I would guess that she's ok. but you can never be too safe, if you can afford it, take her to a vet just to make sure.

Question about watering house plants.?

I have several plants like Dracaena (lucky bamboo), Venus Fly Trap, and an Orchid all of which require distilled water because they are sensitive to chlorine in tap water. I also Have several fish tanks that require me to use a water conditioner to remove the chlorine and chemicals so I was wondering if I can use conditioned water (not tank water) instead of distilled water to water these plants. I'm kind of tired of buying special water just for a few plants. I'm wondering if anyone has ever tried this.

Anyone have any opinions or facts about this idea?

Question about watering house plants.?
Don't used conditioned water on your plants. It has a high saline content, and will eventually kill them. If you have a filter like a Brita filter on your tap, this is all you need to filter the water adequately for your plants. I use water straight out of the tap for my African violets, and I've been winning prizes off and on for about 30 years, so filtered water really isn't necessary.
Reply:By conditioned water, do you mean water that has been softened? If so, I am afraid the answer is, no. Softening water does not take out chlorine.

On the other hand, there is another cheaper way to get distilled water: Find someone who uses a dehumidifier to pull water out of the air and have them save the water from their collection tank for you. The water may be a little dirtier than what you buy, but your plants won't care!
Reply:there is nothing wrong with using your fish tank water on your plants.This water is usually full of nutriants beneficial to plants In a balanced aquarium the plants absorb fish waste and produce oxygen that produces good water quality. When a fish dies I burry its remains in one of my house plant pots you would be amazed at the results (this is not recomended for orchids)many fertilizers are fish based
Reply:Conditioned water and reverse osmosis water are two different things. A water softner or conditioner uses salt which is a no no for all of the above. If you are refering to a RO or reverse osmosis, yes you can absolutely use that and stop the distilled. If you have a PPM meter (parts per million)you can tell how clean your RO water really is. RO is what I have used for years and is fine for everything.
Reply:I'm just going to add a few things from my other 'answer'. 'Dances-' is very lucky to have naturally soft tap water, a Brita removes organics and dissolved gases but won't remove minerals. The condensate from dehumidifiers and A/C units may be low in minerals but contains many dissolved organics. Everything from cooking oil and smoke, your breath, carpeting and paint, just too many unknowns for your "delicate three". RScott

My green plants are Yellow.

Please help! i have two plants a "Tricolor Dracaena" and a "Janet Craig Dracaena" i just recently purchased both from a nursery. It hasnt been one week since i bought them and my Janet Craig plant has espicially turned yellow! i mean these plants are green, and all of sudden 50% of the plant is yellow and the tips are burnt. i have no idea wut the cause of this is and how i should prevent it from ttly wiping out my whole plant. i bought these plants for 100 dollars each. and i want to take good care of them! so please advice anyone?

My green plants are Yellow.
the usual cause of yellowing in houseplants is lack of light. However, as strange as it may seem, dont move them. Your plants just went into shock because of the move and change of light. Plants like the Dracaena can change from high light to low light but they have to lose some leaves to do it. Dont rotate your plant. Just keep it watered every two weeks or so, (only water when the soil is dry about 1 inch below surface) also, I recommend not cutting off any apparently dead leaves until they are brown. You want the plant to use its energy to survive right now, not grow new leaves.
Reply:As it happened suddenly I discount lack of water but that would be first check especially if you transplanted them. If that is not the case go to the nursery where you bought them and they will ask questions that will bring about an answer. In some stores .Lowes, Menard's,Home Depot there usually is a Big book by Ortho which has a large problem and answer section that will deal with individual plants such as your dracena.
Reply:changing color of plants can indicate couple things . in your case it looks like lack of nitrogen.. u can simply go out and buy a organic nutrient and you'll notice dramatic change in color.. preferably a 10-10-4 nutrient = N-P-K n= nitrogen p= phosphorus k= potassium

i noticed that guano's work very well and they are all organic and provide all nutrients needed in one bag. instead of buying multiple hydro nutrients or reg store bought stuff. you can find guano anywhere almost these days

yellowing leaves - lack of nitrogen

brownish leaves - too much light or burnt by nutrient

crispy leaves - too much light too much nutrient

light color green leaves - lack of nitrogen

under performing plants - lack of light and lack of nutrient

droppy leaves - lack of water or light

leaves bending towards the sky = priceless = perfect balance of everything

hope this helps lol
Reply:for a hundred dollars each, I would march back in to the nursery and tell them to keep them until they are healthy. who knows, they may have been overfed as they often are being delivered to nurseries from the growers. take them back and plop them down for replacements.
Reply:If you only bought them a week ago then I would definitely take them back. For that kind of money you need an explanation. Good luck.
Reply:sounds like they are getting tooo much sun and burning move them to a shadier area and give some water look in home depot for a treatment to put in the soil to boost them back
Reply:Is it getting full sun? If so, it may be getting "burnt". It doesn't like direct light. Indirect or filtered is best.

If you bought just a week ago - I would check into the return policy of the store.


What are these white spots on a dracena - Biology

Okay, my wife has this Dracaena marginata - two stalks, I guess you'd call them.

Well, 1 1/2 stalks now. The cat attacked it sometime this morning, and broke one off at the point where the leaves end and the stalk/trunk/whatever begins.

Anyway, I'd like to repair/replant it. Which I did - stuck the broken-off part in the dirt near the original plant. But, not knowing much about this sort off thing, I don't know if that'll bring it back to life or just give it a different place to die.

Is there anything that can be done for it that I haven't? Splint it with popsicle sticks? Splice it back together ala jr. high vaguely-remembered biology? Play the entire Beatles anthology for it?

She just got the plant, and she's already pretty fond of it, so I'd like to keep it (and the errant cat) alive %26amp healthy.

How to help a broken Dracaena marginata?
If the plant is jagged where the cat attacked it, make a clean cut straight across with a sharp knife. New lateral growth will come in time. Take the broken off part and make a clean cut on IT. Let it dry for a day (until it stops "bleeding") then you can replant it in the same pot. With enough water and some plant food it should take. There is also a product called Root-tone where you dip the bottom of the broken stem in it and then plant it . Or you can root it in water by itself, then replant it in the same pot or start a new one. Good luck.
Reply:not sure
Reply:The broken plant will shoot a new growth in no time. You can put the broken-off part into a jar with water, it will root very quickly. Then plant it in a pot with tropical soil mix and keep the soil slightly moist - there will be another plant for you to enjoy. Dracaenas are very forgiving and tolerant plants.


Astroscopus guttatus

Northern Stargazer. Photo © George Burgess

This stout fish has a special organ just behind its eyes that produces an electric shock which it uses defensively, so caution is advised when handling. It has completely adapted to spending most of its life buried in sand, waiting to ambush its prey and gulp it down whole. The eyes, gill slits, nostrils and most of its mouth are on the top of its body, and its pectoral fins are adept at digging and burying. It is a dark blackish-brown with white spots on head and body, and striped fins, and it can grow to almost 22 inches long.

Order – Perciformes Family – Uranoscopidae Genus – Astroscopus Species – guttatus

Common Names

Northern stargazer (English), aranhuco (Portuguese), bezmek (Serbian), cabecudo (Portuguese), kurbaga baligi (Turkish), lychnos (Greek), pesce prete (Italian), rata (Spanish), skaber amerykanski (Polish), sterngucker (German), stjarnkikare (Swedish), and taivaantahystaja (Finnish).

Importance to Humans

Because of the stargazer’s ability to produce electrical currents, live specimens of this species should be handled with care. If approached by a diver, it generally will not move unless disturbed.

Conservation

The northern stargazer is not listed as endangered or vulnerable with the World Conservation Union (IUCN). The IUCN is a global union of states, governmental agencies, and non-governmental organizations in a partnership that assesses the conservation status of species.

World distribution map for the northern stargazer

Geographical Distribution

It inhabits sandy bottoms of the temperate waters of the western Atlantic, ranging from North Carolina to New York.

Habitat

The northern stargazer, Astroscopus guttatus, is a benthic species, living most of its life on or under the bottom. It is found inshore, at depths to 120 feet (36 m).

Biology

Northern Stargazer. Photo © George Burgess

Distinctive Features
The northern stargazer is well adapted to life under the sand. The body is moderately elongate. Its pectoral fins act as shovels, enabling the fish to bury itself in a matter of seconds. The eyes and nostrils are strategically located on the top of the head so that they will remain above the sand when the fish is buried. Unlike most species of fish that bring water in through their mouths to breathe, the stargazer breathes through its nostrils. The nostrils are protected from sand grains by fleshy, comb-shaped fringes. The mouth also has these fringes around it to keep sand out while the fish is buried. The eyes are capable of protruding for a short distance, appearing stalked, for a limited amount of time to allow the fish to gaze over the bottom. The stargazer does this by filling the tissues behind the eyes with liquid. The gill slit is narrow and drawn backwards and upwards into a short, baggy tube. This tube carries waste water away from the fish and outside the surrounding sand. This fish possesses a special talent: it is able to create weak electrical currents from a specialized organ located behind the eyes.

Southern Stargazer. Note stripe begins to fade past the tail compared to the tail stripe of the northern stargazer pictured at the top of page. Photo © George Burgess

Coloration
The blackish-brown body is covered with white spots that gradually increase in size towards the rear of the body. Top of head and body has small, closely spaced white dots. There are three dark, horizontal stripes on the tail. The southern stargazer, Astroscopus y-graecum, closely resembles the northern stargazer in appearance and in life history. An easy way to tell these two species apart is to note the middle stripe on the tail. On the northern stargazer, this stripe extends onto the rear portion of the body on the southern stargazer this stripe does not extend pass the tail.

Size
Adults may reach 22 inches (56 cm) in length, but are more common at lengths of 8-18 inches (20-46 cm).

Food Habits
The diet of the northern stargazer consists of smaller fish that are unlucky enough to swim near it. The electrical organ is not used to capture prey. Its main function is to protect the stargazer from anything that may pose a threat to the well being of the fish. The stargazer instead relies on its camouflage and lies in wait for a small fish to swim near it. Once the prey is in range, the stargazer rises from the sand and in an instant swallows the fish whole.

The developmental stages of the northern stargazer larvae. Note the migration of the eyes. Illustrations courtesy Pearson (1941) and Bean (1888) in Development of Fishes of the Mid-Atlantic Bight – U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Reproduction
True to its benthic nature, the northern stargazer spawns on the bottom during the late spring and early summer months. The eggs are small, transparent, and slowly float to the surface. These eggs hatch into small, transparent larvae that live in the water column. These pelagic larvae grow rapidly, feeding off the yolk sac until they reach about 6-7 mm in length. When they reach this length, the yolk sack has been completely consumed and the larvae begin feeding on other larvae in the water column, including some of their own kind. They also begin to acquire a black color that deepens with time. As they grow, a bright yellow spot appears on the chin. The electric organs begin to form when the larvae reach about 12-15 mm in length. At this length the larvae will migrate to the bottom and become a true juvenile. Juvenile stargazers tend to move inshore to sandy bays, where they may stay for several years. The juveniles will develop the characteristic patterns of the adults during the time spent in the sandy bays. The eyes, which were on the side of the larval head, will also migrate to the top of the head. When the juveniles reach about a foot in length, they move offshore and become adults.

Taxonomy

Juvenile northern stargazer. Photo © George Burgess

Abbott (1860) described the northern stargazer as Astroscopus guttatus. Astroscopus is derived from the Greek word “astro” = star and the latin word “scopus” = mark at which to shoot. Guttatus is also Latin for “speckled”, referring to the white spots on this fish.Prepared by: Casey Patton


Houseplant Care: Brown Spots on My Dracaena?

If you notice brown tips and spots on your dracaena, the problem is probably due to inconsistent watering. If the soil dries out too much, the tips of the leaves will present with brown tips and spots.

How to fix it:

Water your Dracaena when the top 75% of soil in the pot is dry to the touch. Check your plants about every 7 to 10 days and remember that our homes are often hot and dry in the winter, so plants may need to be watered more often.

Potential Cause 2: Water Sensitivity

If you notice brown spots on the tips and edges of leaves, this could be a sign of chlorine and/or fluoride in the tap water or, a build-up of salts within the soil.

How to fix it:

Fill a container with your tap water and allow it to sit uncovered for at least 24 hours so that the chlorine and fluoride can evaporate. Another option is to use rainwater or distilled water instead.

Also, if you notice an accumulation of white deposits on the outside of the pot (especially near the drainage holes), this is a sign of excess salts. Use rainwater or distilled water to flush out excess salt.

Potential Cause 3: Leaf Spot Disease

If you see small brown spots trimmed in yellow, your plant might have a Leaf Spot Disease. The attacking fungus or bacteria leaves small brown spots trimmed in yellow where it’s feeding on the leaves. These spots may vary in shape, color, and size.

How to fix it:

Immediately remove the affected leaves and isolate your Dracaena from your other plants for the time being. To treat Leaf Spot Disease, try this homemade remedy of putting a tablespoon or two of baking soda and a teaspoon or two of mineral oil in a spray bottle of water. Shake the solution well and then spray all areas of the plant that are infected with brown spots.

Photo credit: Missouri Botanical Garden

Plant Mom Note:

I suggest always removing the damaged area of a leaf or the complete leaf if entirely brown. Removal of the dead leaf or damaged areas helps the plant recover and look its best. You will need very sharp scissors or pruning shears.

Instructions for proper removal of damaged or dead leaves:

1. Trim off brown leaf tips or spots with clean shears. Cut off only the damaged tips or spots leaving a tiny margin of brown so not to damage the remaining healthy foliage on the plant.
2. If the entire leaf has turned brown, remove individual leaves at their base. Pull the leaf gently it may come off on its own. If the leaf doesn’t separate with gentle pulling, snip through the stem with clean shears.

Do you have a plant question or concern? Don’t worry Plant Mom is here to help! No matter what your question is or what kind of plant you have, I am here to answer your questions and give you the encouragement you need to be the best plant parent you can be. I want to share my love and knowledge of plants with you.


Watch the video: Πού οφείλονται ΑΥΤΑ τα λευκά σημάδια στα δόντια Τι πρέπει να κάνετε (July 2022).


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