Information

4.4: Key Words and Terms - Biology


actual free energy

endothermic

Law of Conservation

ATP

energy

Laws of Thermodynamics

bioenergetics

energy transduction

light

Boltzman equation

energy transfer

mass

calories

enthalpy

open system properties

calorimeter

entropy

open systems

chemical energy

equilibrium constant

order vs. entropy

chemical equilibrium

exergonic

standard conditions

closed systems

exothermic

standard free energy

decibels

free energy

steady state

e=mc2

gas constant

useful energy

electricity

Gibbs free energy

useless energy

endergonic

Keq

volts


Keyword Activity Packs for GCSE AQA Biology

A comprehensive activity pack to help students learn the essential terms for the 2016 GCSE course.

Flexible resources with a consistent approach

J Willoughby, HoD and Peer Reviewer

Loop game / dominoes, glossary builders and crosswords (inc. interactive versions) are among the activities designed to make key term revision as effective and engaging as possible for students.

  • Student-friendly definitions make complex terms accessible to all
  • Endless uses – homework, starters & plenaries, revision lessons or individual support
  • CD-ROM format allows straightforward sharing on the school network

What do teachers say about this resource? (8221)

It provides a range of flexible resources with a consistent approach , simply laid out and organised logically.

It is an excellent resource to support 1:1 learning development for the least able but also good adaptable resources for class/revision use .

J Willoughby, HoD and Peer Reviewer

Keywords

  • 4.1 Cell biology
  • 4.2 Organisation
  • 4.3 Infection and response
  • 4.4 Bioenergetics
  • GCSE AQA Biology (8461)
  • GCSE AQA Biology Paper 1
  • GCSE Biology
  • GCSE Biology Keyword Activity Pack
  • GCSE Keyword Activity Pack
  • GCSE Science Keyword Activity Pack
  • 4.5 Homeostasis and response
  • 4.6 Inheritance, variation and evolution
  • 4.7 Ecology
  • GCSE AQA Biology Paper 2

An excellent resource to support 1:1 learning development for the least able but also good adaptable resources for class/revision use

J Willoughby, HoD and Peer Reviewer

© ZigZag Education®, Unit 3, Greenway Business Centre, Doncaster Road, Bristol BS10 5PY | Privacy Policy | Cookie Policy | Accessibility Policy |


4.4: Key Words and Terms - Biology

All articles published by MDPI are made immediately available worldwide under an open access license. No special permission is required to reuse all or part of the article published by MDPI, including figures and tables. For articles published under an open access Creative Common CC BY license, any part of the article may be reused without permission provided that the original article is clearly cited.

Feature Papers represent the most advanced research with significant potential for high impact in the field. Feature Papers are submitted upon individual invitation or recommendation by the scientific editors and undergo peer review prior to publication.

The Feature Paper can be either an original research article, a substantial novel research study that often involves several techniques or approaches, or a comprehensive review paper with concise and precise updates on the latest progress in the field that systematically reviews the most exciting advances in scientific literature. This type of paper provides an outlook on future directions of research or possible applications.

Editor’s Choice articles are based on recommendations by the scientific editors of MDPI journals from around the world. Editors select a small number of articles recently published in the journal that they believe will be particularly interesting to authors, or important in this field. The aim is to provide a snapshot of some of the most exciting work published in the various research areas of the journal.


Overview of GoMiner

GoMiner takes as input two lists of genes: the total set on the array and the subset that the user flags as interesting (for example, altered in expression level). GoMiner displays the genes within the framework of the Gene Ontology hierarchy, both as a directed acyclic graph (DAG) and as the equivalent tree structure. The latter is similar in format to the visualization in the AmiGO browser display [1]. However, each category is annotated to reflect the number of genes from the user's experiment assigned to that category plus the number assigned to its progeny categories (Figure 1a). This computation does not double-count genes that appear more than once along the traversal. The user has the option of designating each gene within the 'interesting gene' list as exhibiting under- or overexpression. If that is done, genes displayed in the tree-like view are tagged with green down-arrows or red up-arrows, respectively.

GoMiner displays for microarray gene-expression data on prostate cancer cell line DU145 and a subline (RC0.1) selected for resistance to a topoisomerase 1 inhibitor. (a) Tree-like display showing underexpressed genes (green down-arrows), overexpressed genes (red up-arrows), and unchanged genes (gray circles) in the GO 'Apoptosis Regulator' category and its subcategories. The blue number indicates a 2.4-fold enrichment of changed genes in this category. The p-value (Fisher's exact) indicates that, despite this degree of enrichment, the small total number of genes (14) in this category prevents statistical significance. (b) Dynamically generated SVG graphic of the 'Biological Process' DAG with genes in the GO 'Apoptosis Regulator' category opened in a pull-down list by mousing-over. Categories enriched more than 1.5-fold with flagged genes are color-coded red those depleted more than 1.5-fold are blue. The rest of the categories are gray.

The most important parameter for purposes of interpretation is the enrichment (or depletion) of a category with respect to flagged genes (relative to what would have been expected by chance alone). This parameter will be discussed more extensively and more mathematically in the section on 'Statistical considerations'. In Figure 1a, the relative enrichment is indicated by blue numbers for total flagged genes and by red and green numbers for over- and underexpressed genes, respectively. The last number (blue) for each category is a two-sided p-value from Fisher's exact test.

In GoMiner, clicking on a gene of interest in the tree-structure opens a menu that can be used to submit that gene as a query to an external data resource. The number of such links is being expanded rapidly, but currently included are LocusLink [7], PubMed [8], MedMiner [9, 10], GeneCards [11], the NCBI's Structure Database [12], and BioCarta and KEGG pathway maps as implemented by the NCI Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (CGAP) [13]. These external databases provide GoMiner with a rich set of resources for bioinformatic integration. For example, the links with CGAP and LocusLink provide interaction with pathway maps, chromosome visualizations, a database of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), and the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC).

In GoMiner, clicking on a category instead of a gene brings up a second visualization (Figure 1b), a DAG programmed as a scalable vector graphic (SVG) that can be navigated fluently. Any of its nodes can be moused-over to list the flagged genes or clicked to highlight multiple pathways connecting it to the root. Detailed quantitative and statistical results are downloadable in several tab-delimited formats that can be read directly into a text file or a spreadsheet program for further analysis. For example, the spreadsheet data can be sorted by enrichment factor or p-value to focus attention on potentially interesting categories.


4.4: Key Words and Terms - Biology

All articles published by MDPI are made immediately available worldwide under an open access license. No special permission is required to reuse all or part of the article published by MDPI, including figures and tables. For articles published under an open access Creative Common CC BY license, any part of the article may be reused without permission provided that the original article is clearly cited.

Feature Papers represent the most advanced research with significant potential for high impact in the field. Feature Papers are submitted upon individual invitation or recommendation by the scientific editors and undergo peer review prior to publication.

The Feature Paper can be either an original research article, a substantial novel research study that often involves several techniques or approaches, or a comprehensive review paper with concise and precise updates on the latest progress in the field that systematically reviews the most exciting advances in scientific literature. This type of paper provides an outlook on future directions of research or possible applications.

Editor’s Choice articles are based on recommendations by the scientific editors of MDPI journals from around the world. Editors select a small number of articles recently published in the journal that they believe will be particularly interesting to authors, or important in this field. The aim is to provide a snapshot of some of the most exciting work published in the various research areas of the journal.


Hi I'm Michelle. I've finished IGCSEs and the IB but I hope these blogs help people with their IGCSEs anyway!! :)

Note: That's why these blogs are no longer updated, what's there is all I had time for back then so I'm sorry that they're not fully complete with the whole syllabus and all. Hope what's there helps anyway.. :)

I do actually have more notes than is posted, and these can be purchased by buying my IGCSE Notes sets.

Contact me at: [email protected]


AQA Biology 4.4- L4 Anaerobic Respiration

I am a lead Biology Teacher at a secondary school. My resources are designed for the new AQA GCSE Biology curriculum and many of them can also be used for the new AQA GCSE Synergy curriculum. Each lesson is power point based and includes information slides along with differentiated pupil activities (to maximise active learning opportunities).

Share this

New AQA GCSE Biology scheme (2016).

A lesson on anaerobic respiration in animals, plants and yeast cells. Activities include planning investigations, comparing types of respiration and understanding oxygen debt.

Includes a teacher powerpoint and differentiated pupil activities.

Get this resource as part of a bundle and save up to 8%

A bundle is a package of resources grouped together to teach a particular topic, or a series of lessons, in one place.

NEW AQA Biology - 4.4 Bioenergetics Complete Unit

A complete unit (4.4) for the new AQA Biology specification. Includes all power points and pupil activities needed to teach the new AQA specification. Lots of the activities are differentiated and are easily adapted to suit the needs of individuals in the classroom. Also includes an end of unit test to assess pupil progress across the topic. Lessons included: 1. Photosynthesis 2. Limiting Factors 3. Aerobic Respiration 4. Anaerobic Respiration 5. Response to Exercise 6. Progress Test


Top 500 Resume Keywords List

Below is a list of the hard skills and keywords that appear most frequently in Jobscan‘s database of real job descriptions. These are the top resume keywords recruiters, hiring managers, and ATS algorithms are looking for when vetting applicants.

These examples demonstrate the types of keywords to include in your resume. To boost your chances of getting past an ATS and landing a job interview, be sure to to tailor your resume keywords to the specific job for which you’re applying.

Try the Jobscan resume optimization tool to get your personalized list of top resume keywords:

This list of keywords includes variations of the same words and phrases, for example Microsoft Office (124), MS Office (137), and Microsoft Office Suite (324). This isn’t a mistake. The levels of sophistication vary between ATS, but most cannot differentiate between synonyms, abbreviations, or similar skills.

Rank higher in the ATS or a recruiter’s search results by matching your resume keywords to exactly what’s in the job description.

    1. design
    2. operations
    3. technical
    4. training
    5. sales
    6. marketing
    7. reporting
    8. compliance
    9. strategy
    10. research
    11. analytical
    12. engineering
    13. policies
    14. budget
    15. finance
    16. project management
    17. health
    18. customer service
    19. documentation
    20. content
    21. presentation
    22. brand
    23. presentations
    24. safety
    25. certification
    1. accounting
    2. regulations
    3. metrics
    4. legal
    5. engagement
    6. database
    7. analytics
    8. distribution
    9. coaching
    10. testing
    11. vendors
    12. consulting
    13. writing
    14. contracts
    15. inventory
    16. retail
    17. healthcare
    18. regulatory
    19. scheduling
    20. construction
    21. logistics
    22. mobile
    23. C (programming language)
    24. correspondence
    25. controls

    Resume Keywords Tip: Different Names for the Same Thing

    Optimizing your resume keywords isn’t as simple as stuffing industry-specific skills and jargon into your resume. It’s about tweaking the keywords already in your resume to match the job description.

    For example, if you’re a graphic designer, you probably have a lot of experience with Adobe Creative Cloud, Adobe’s software bundle that includes standards like Photoshop and Illustrator. But say the job description mentions only “Adobe Creative Suite,” its former name.

    If you have “Adobe Creative Cloud” on your resume but the hiring manager searches the ATS for “Adobe Creative Suite,” you could be excluded from the results even though you possess the exact skillset they’re looking for. In this example, you want to optimize your Adobe experience by changing the resume keyword to “Adobe Creative Suite.”

      1. human resources
      2. specifications
      3. recruitment
      4. procurement
      5. partnership
      6. partnerships
      7. management experience
      8. negotiation
      9. hardware
      10. programming
      11. agile
      12. forecasting
      13. advertising
      14. business development
      15. audit
      16. architecture
      17. supply chain
      18. governance
      19. staffing
      20. continuous improvement
      21. product development
      22. networking
      23. recruiting
      24. product management
      25. CRM
      1. SAP
      2. troubleshooting
      3. computer science
      4. budgeting
      5. electrical
      6. customer experience
      7. I-DEAS
      8. economics
      9. information technology
      10. transportation
      11. social media
      12. automation
      13. lifecycle
      14. filing
      15. modeling
      16. investigation
      17. SQL
      18. editing
      19. purchasing
      20. KPIs
      21. hospital
      22. forecasts
      23. acquisition
      24. expenses
      25. billing

      Resume Keywords Tip: Editing Job Titles is OK

      The same thing can happen with job titles. There are many variations of job titles based on industry, company culture, or experience levels. Incorporating specific keywords and phrasing into job titles will make a difference in an ATS search.

      Three examples:

      1.) You’re applying for a position as a “Content Writer” but your previous job title was “Content Creator.” The hiring manager will likely search “Content Writer” in hopes of finding someone with direct experience. It’s the same job, so change “Creator” to “Writer” on your resume to increase your searchability.

      2.) The job title buzzword fad (ninjas, gurus, rock stars et al) is thankfully dying out but you still have “Customer Service Wizard” on your resume from a previous job. Unless a job description asks for actual sorcery skills, change the experience on your resume to something that reflects the new job for which you’re applying.

      3 .) You worked for six years as the Web Developer at a small firm that didn’t differentiate experience levels. In other contexts, you would be a “Senior Web Developer,” so make that change on your resume as you pursue other senior-level positions.

      There’s nothing wrong with changing your “official” job title on your resume. All you’re doing is translating past experience into the same language as a hiring company. This is what optimizing your resume keywords is all about.

      Important note: This is about recontextualizing your work experience rather than improving it. Do not give yourself a promotion you felt you deserved but didn’t get.

      Jobscan Skills Reports

      Most common skills, most overvalued skills, and most in-demand skills by job title:

        1. change management
        2. video
        3. invoices
        4. administrative support
        5. payments
        6. lean
        7. process improvement
        8. installation
        9. risk management
        10. transactions
        11. investigations
        12. payroll
        13. R (programming language)
        14. data analysis
        15. statistics
        16. coding
        17. protocols
        18. program management
        19. quality assurance
        20. windows
        21. banking
        22. outreach
        23. sourcing
        24. Microsoft Office
        25. merchandising
        1. business requirements
        2. drawings
        3. Salesforce
        4. documenting
        5. information systems
        6. nursing
        7. business administration
        8. consumers
        9. financial services
        10. legislation
        11. strategic planning
        12. MS Office
        13. counseling
        14. technical support
        15. frameworks
        16. performance management
        17. BI
        18. fashion
        19. HTML
        20. publications
        21. internship
        22. QA
        23. software development
        24. oracle
        25. Java

        Resume Keywords Tip: Tense and Format Matters (Mattered, Mattering)

        A few ATS recognize tenses, plurals, and other word variations, but most only find exact matches. That means that if a recruiter searches for “project manager,” you won’t come up as a search result if your resume only includes the phrases “managing projects,” “project managed,” and “project management.”

        Other examples:

        • market, marketed, marketer, marketing
        • strategize, strategized, strategist, strategizing
        • test, tested, tester, testing
        • schedule, scheduled, scheduler, scheduling

        The best practice for determining which tense or form to use with your resume keywords is to mirror the job description. If “manager” is used frequently in the job description but your resume says “Managed team of 11 engineers,” simply rewrite it to say “Manager to a team of 11 engineers.”


        Hi I'm Michelle. I've finished IGCSEs and the IB but I hope these blogs help people with their IGCSEs anyway!! :)

        Note: That's why these blogs are no longer updated, what's there is all I had time for back then so I'm sorry that they're not fully complete with the whole syllabus and all. Hope what's there helps anyway.. :)

        I do actually have more notes than is posted, and these can be purchased by buying my IGCSE Notes sets.

        Contact me at: [email protected]


        Resume Examples: Keywords for Biomedical Engineering

        Trista Winnie has been writing and editing professionally for nearly a decade, primarily covering the job search, investing, engineering, and health. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Pacific Lutheran University and her master’s degree from Gonzaga University. In her free time, she enjoys reading, cooking, and sports.

        Biomedical engineering is an interesting and challenging field, requiring knowledge of biology, medicine, and more, on top of typical engineering knowledge. It’s also a field poised for growth. “ Employment of biomedical engineers is projected to grow 27 percent from 2012 to 2022, much faster than the average for all occupations,” according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook. “Demand will be strong because an aging population is likely to need more medical care and because of increased public awareness of biomedical engineering advances and their benefits.”

        If you’re interested in pursuing biomedical engineering, reading some resume examples from those already in the field can help you learn about expectations, necessary skills, potential hurdles, career trajectories, and more.

        The word cloud above was created using the text of 10 biomedical engineering job listings. The larger the word, the more times it appeared.

        Mechanical engineering resume keywords

        • Analysis
        • Bachelor’s
        • Biological
        • Biomedical
        • Clinical
        • Data
        • Degree
        • Design
        • Development
        • Device
        • Engineering
        • Equipment
        • Healthcare
        • Master’s
        • Materials
        • Mechanical
        • Medical
        • Problem-solving
        • Product
        • Research
        • Results
        • Team
        • Technical
        • Testing

        Notes on biomedical engineering keywords

        Highlighting your education properly is going to be more important for current or aspiring biomedical engineers than for those in most other industries. It is a relatively new field, and more and more schools are adding programs or expanding offerings. More importantly, this is the first field for which we’ve done a round-up of resume keywords where “master’s degree” was mentioned as a prerequisite for so many jobs that it wound up on our list of top keywords.

        Many biomedical engineers wind up choosing a specialty area, such as a particular disease, organ, or technology (for example, implants or drug delivery). Having the right keywords is especially critical if you’re applying for a biomedical engineering job with a particular focus. A career summary is an ideal way to lead off your resume with those relevant keywords. If your resume lacks the right keywords, an applicant tracking system (ATS) is almost certainly going to pass you over.

        Don’t forget to pay attention to slight differences, such as “laboratory” vs. “lab” or “healthcare” vs. “health care.” ATS are always getting more sophisticated, but almost every single one still looks for exact keyword matches.

        Targeting your resume

        To learn how well your resume matches up with the biomedical engineering job of your choice, try Jobscan’s resume analysis tool. Your instant feedback will include a match rating, plus suggestions for optimizing your resume keywords and your resume as a whole. Resume examples are a valuable resource for research, but nothing can beat individualized, targeted feedback.


        Watch the video: Notes for IB Biology (December 2021).